New York City NYC

UPPER MANHATTAN

Known for
  • Harlem Brownstones
  • Inwood Park
  • Little Red Lighthouse
  • The Apollo Theater
  • The Cloisters
  • The Morris-Jumel Mansion
  • Thriving jazz scene

Manhattan above 96th Street. Neighborhoods include Harlem, Inwood, Washington Heights, Hamilton Heights and Morningside Heights.

 

Local Flavor
Back in the 1700’s, Manhattan’s northernmost region was a densely-forested retreat reserved for patrician New Yorkers. But when Columbia University opened its Morningside Heights campus in 1895, Upper Manhattan began its inevitable journey toward urbanization. Today, there are few areas of the city where the term “melting pot” applies as aptly as it does here. Generations of Hispanic, Eastern European, African-American, Greek and Italian families with deep neighborhood roots have recently been complemented by new residents, drawn here for the quiet streets, gently sloping parks, abundant ethnic eateries and ample living space available at relatively affordable prices.

 

Iconic Architecture
Upper Manhattan’s diverse neighborhoods offer a spectrum of residences and building styles that range from landmark-status mansions to student walk-ups to once-grand row houses in need of TLC. The many choices include multi-apartment buildings for sale in Central Harlem, gloriously restored, single-family townhouses in Hamilton Heights and affordable co-ops and condos–some with doormen–in Inwood and Washington Heights. Recent construction includes rental towers along Morningside Drive that take advantage of spectacular sunrises and river views.

 

Historic Highlights

Four hundred years ago in Inwood Park, Manhattan was purchased from the Native Americans who had made their homes here for eons. Inwood Park still holds traces of their culture in the caves, artesian springs and indigenous tulip trees that were used to craft their canoes.

 

  • Washington Heights is home to the Morris-Jumel Mansion, the city’s oldest surviving residence and now a fully-furnished museum. George Washington slept here in 1776, Alexander Hamilton dined here in 1790 and Aaron Burr, the man who shot him, lived here after he married Madame Eliza Jumel.
  • A delightfully out-of-place tower known as “The Little Red Lighthouse” rests underneath the George Washington Bridge. The lighthouse became famous after a bestselling children’s book about it was published in 1942.

Neighborhood Favorites

Sister’s Uptown Bookstore

Demolition Depot

Lexington Pizza Parlour

Manolo Tapas

Taszo Espresso Bar

Tsion Cafe

Red Rooster

Heights Tavern

Morris–Jumel Mansion

Hamilton Grange National Memorial

The Cloisters