New York City NYC

QUEENS

Known for
  • Astoria's restaurant scene
  • Citi Field
  • Coney Island
  • Rockaway Beach
  • The US Open

The easternmost and largest borough, Queens is located adjacent to Brooklyn on the western end of Long Island.  

 

 

Although many claim Brooklyn is New York’s hottest outer borough, Queens is definitely catching up. In Western Queens especially, hip bars and restaurants in Astoria and Long Island City are drawing the kind of clientele one would expect to see in Williamsburg, while a surge in new residential developments emphasizes that exciting changes are afoot. Long Island City boasts location, location, location—not only its East River views and one-stop-to-Manhattan subway commute, but also as the epicenter of the city’s film and television industry. With its reasonable rents, thriving arts scene and abundance of ethnic restaurants, Astoria draws creative types as well as urban professionals and young families seeking a more affordable alternative to Manhattan.

 

Iconic Architecture

Waterfront high rises dominate the landscape in Long Island City’s gentrified Hunter’s Point, where views of Manhattan are unbeatable. The Hunters Point South project will bring thousands of middle-income units to the area. In Astoria south of Grand Central Parkway, low-rise apartment buildings offer well-priced rentals within a 20-minute commute to Midtown Manhattan.

 

Historic Highlights

  • In a battle for religious freedom in 1657, the Quakers of Queens drafted a document called “The Flushing Remonstrance, ” which some historians regard as America’s earliest Declaration of Independence.
  • The most momentous event in Queens history occurred in 1909, when the long-awaited Queensboro Bridge finally opened, ending 100 years of isolation for the borough.
  • In 1983, Silvercup Studios opened in Long Island City’s landmark Silvercup Bakery, and has since become the largest full-service film and television production center on the East Coast.