New York City NYC

MIDTOWN EAST

Known for
  • Chrysler Building
  • Grand Central Terminal
  • Legendary Bloomingdales
  • Plaza Hotel
  • Sutton Place
  • The United Nations

Bounded by Madison Avenue to the west, 59th Street to the north, 34th Street to south and the East River to the east. Neighborhoods include Murray Hill, Sutton Place and Beekman Place.   

 

Midtown East is an eclectic section of Manhattan with multiple personalities. At its center is a bustling business district containing some of the city’s most iconic edifices, including Grand Central Terminal, the Waldorf-Astoria and the Chrysler Building. Historic mansions are tucked in between modern high-rises in nearby Murray Hill, where, thanks to its proximity to the United Nations, many countries operate embassies and consulates. Folks who live here enjoy an easy walk to many corporate headquarters as well as convenient access to department stores, bars and restaurants. Overlooking the East River, the elegant enclaves of Sutton Place and Beekman Place are pockets of tranquility filled with dog-friendly buildings and neighbors who have known each other for years. Residents include many doctors, who prize the quick access to Manhattan’s top hospitals via the nearby FDR Drive.

 

Iconic Architecture

 

Midtown East features a little bit of everything, from soaring glass high-rises to brownstones to the jewel-like Sniffen Court, a hidden mews of Civil War-era carriage houses on 36th Street. Sutton Place is renowned for some of the city’s most prestigious co-op apartment buildings and town houses, some with stunning features like wrought-iron gates and lush, rolling lawns. The two-block neighborhood of Beekman Place is primarily filled with luxurious prewar co-ops.

 

Historic Highlights

 

  • During the bitter winter of 1808, an innovative public program kept laid-off dockworkers busy by employing them to slice through the almost impenetrable rock summits of Murray Hill.
  • The magnificent, 48-foot-high clock face in front of Grand Central Terminal, unveiled in 1914, is the world’s largest example of Tiffany glass.
  • Sutton Place rose to fashionable prominence in 1920, when wealthy socialites, Anne Harriman Vanderbilt and Anne Morgan built townhouses overlooking the East River.

Neighborhood Favorites

Argosy Bookstore

Sprinkles Cupcake ATM

Bill’s Townhouse

Pizza by Certé

The Palm Court

Ninth Street Espresso

Gregory’s Coffee

Casa Lever

Monkey Bar

Grand Central Terminal

Bryant Park

St. Patrick’s Cathedral